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So I'm learning how to setup cisco networks


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#1 SpleenBeGone

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 10:10 AM

It's a little more involved than what I'm used to. I'd like to think the newer switches probably have a GUI, but I'm using some 3500's from 2000 and 2001 so everything is terminal based.

 

I've got 3, 48 port 3500xl switches, and one 24 port 3500xl. My first goal was to get them reset and all up and running. That was easy enough. Now I'm making some crossover cable. I want to get them all connected to a cluster without using their gigabit ports, as I don't have the hardware for that. It should be possible, though a bit more complicated. 

 

Anyone have suggestions on what I can do with them all, and what else I should try?


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#2 Big_T

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Posted 27 January 2015 - 01:13 PM

So tad belated, but may be able to help you on this (if ever relevant). I studied 'CCNA Routing and Switching' with the online Cisco Academy.

It's been a while since having gone over the actual content (there is a lot of it), but I'm still fluent in Cisco command line (Cisco IOS - Internetwork Operating System). I'm fairly confident at everything from basic network configuration and debug, to LAN, VLAN, and WAN (and other P2P protocols), ACL's, VPN, DHCP, NAT, encryption ...

 

It almost sounds silly, configuring NAT, DHCP etc on devices when people are used to just using devices and having them just work, with some simple instructions from a guy over the phone (if even that).

I love having to configure everything manually though, especially things like NAT, VLAN's and protocols ... can really set you apart from the general IT community who just follow the "You don't need to know how it works to use it" philosophy.

 

I actually aspire to hold a CCIE or CCDA one day. ($110,000 to $175,000 USD salary)

But not for the money, I just love data and being able to control it's flow, and having the skills to do what 99.999% of people on Earth can't - yet the application of those skills affects majority of internet users. Crazy thought. I'm just dreaming ...

Well, that would be nice.

One step at a time.



#3 SpleenBeGone

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Posted 02 February 2015 - 02:30 PM

Honestly, I found it interesting and fun to work on them. It was more time consuming, admittedly, but I could see someone being able to get decently fast at it. The only real problem I had was that error checking wasn't as easy to do.

 

I still have the stack though, and nothing at all to do with them. 


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#4 Big_T

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Posted 02 February 2015 - 05:30 PM

So time consuming! Once you know all the shortcuts and partial-commands you just whiz through it though.

Similar to coding in an IDE, no one writes out whole commands (although I recommend learning in a text editor to really nail something)

 

You have a Cisco stack? Sweet! I used the hardware for exams and stuff back when I was studying it, but most of the time just in Packet Tracer.



#5 SpleenBeGone

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Posted 02 February 2015 - 05:35 PM

Mhmm, all the left over stuff from when big oil owned the building. 


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