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Your favorite programming language?


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#21 Bell

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Posted 24 July 2012 - 02:07 PM

PHP :) simply because i love web programming and the way php and mysql work together :)
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#22 Rejected

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Posted 10 August 2012 - 07:01 AM

pascal i must say, i have programming in it for 4 years, after that c++ .

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#23 CSS

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Posted 05 November 2012 - 04:14 PM

Java. (NOT Javascript. Please do not ever, EVER get them confused.)

And CSS.

CSS is simple, and the results are beautiful. As you should know.

#24 Majestic

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Posted 05 November 2012 - 04:28 PM

Java. (NOT Javascript. Please do not ever, EVER get them confused.)

And CSS.

CSS is simple, and the results are beautiful. As you should know.


CSS is more markup than programming, like HTML.

PHP is more of a programming language. Although it is interpreted by a C++ compiler it's still functional and could still classed as programming. It is Object Oriented and Procedural, it's a funny language, but it's very good, and is handy to know.

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#25 Guest_ElatedOwl_*

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Posted 05 November 2012 - 04:55 PM

but it's very good

Obligatory link. That said if PHP makes you happy stick with it.

#26 Majestic

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Posted 05 November 2012 - 05:16 PM

Obligatory link. That said if PHP makes you happy stick with it.


That's a very good analogy, but TBH I don't mind the inconsistency in the function names, doesn't really bother me. And some great applications have been made with PHP, such as Facebook, and IPB.

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#27 K_N

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Posted 05 November 2012 - 05:27 PM

Unfortunately a lot of what makes PHP unpredictable is the users' aversion to change. It'd be nice if we could re-write the spec, but too many children would whine. Just look at any changelog where a function that didn't work right was fixed, and people actually complain about not getting the same output anymore, even though they were using the function incorrectly and the output was a result of an error.

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#28 Guest_ElatedOwl_*

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Posted 05 November 2012 - 05:37 PM

That's a very good analogy, but TBH I don't mind the inconsistency in the function names, doesn't really bother me. And some great applications have been made with PHP, such as Facebook, and IPB.

And a great house can be made with solely a hammer, that doesn't make it the right tool for the job though. ;p

#29 K_N

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Posted 05 November 2012 - 07:17 PM

Just out of curiosity, what is your preferred scripting language for database-driven web applications?

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#30 Guest_ElatedOwl_*

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Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:24 PM

It depends on what I'm doing, but if I'm doing strictly database driven stuff I love to work with C#. I'm really comfortable with its reflection environment and extending methods so I can do some pretty neat things.

#31 Majestic

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 01:50 AM

Unfortunately a lot of what makes PHP unpredictable is the users' aversion to change. It'd be nice if we could re-write the spec, but too many children would whine. Just look at any changelog where a function that didn't work right was fixed, and people actually complain about not getting the same output anymore, even though they were using the function incorrectly and the output was a result of an error.

That's true actually.

And a great house can be made with solely a hammer, that doesn't make it the right tool for the job though. ;p

I doubt that :P What about the concrete base?

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#32 Champion of Cyrodiil

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 08:22 AM

PHP is nice because there is no compiling required. Also it is the most common language on the web so there is plenty of support.

However, I believe Java is a more powerful language and there are a lot more java APIs available for different things. (i.e. you wont find facial recognition APIs for PHP.) C# is good too, but not nearly as many APIs available as Java.

I think C/C++ are quite powerful, but is usually used on custom platforms. I think there is a lot of micromanagement involved with C and I personally do not create games so I do not need that much efficiency.

Honestly, with things like Apache Thrift breaking through, it doesn't really matter anymore.

#33 Guest_ElatedOwl_*

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 08:30 AM

PHP is nice because there is no compiling required.

I wouldn't really call that a feature - parsing is slower than compile at run time.

C# is good too, but not nearly as many APIs available as Java.

I mean, a binary is a binary. It doesn't matter what is was compiled from - C, Java, whatever, you can still interface to it.

#34 Champion of Cyrodiil

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 08:44 AM

I wouldn't really call that a feature - parsing is slower than compile at run time.

I mean, a binary is a binary. It doesn't matter what is was compiled from - C, Java, whatever, you can still interface to it.


It is a feature because it is a characteristic of PHP. http://dictionary.re.../browse/feature

You have missed my point. If I wanted to write an application that provides USB interface with a barcode scanner, and handles said barcodes as some kind of primary key... I would probably find APIs and Libraries in Java that are already written for me.

As far as binary is concerned... it matters quite a bit how it was compiled. Some binary instructions are not even compatible with x86 architecture. Additionally, if i just give you an arbitrary binary file without a proper extension, with some proprietary encoding... you would have no idea what to do with it.

Take HDF5 format for example... which would you prefer? A library already written in java that you can use to interface? Or parsing out the bits on your own by offset?

#35 Guest_ElatedOwl_*

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 08:48 AM

Doesn't matter what is was compiled from, not to. :P

#36 SpleenBeGone

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 01:06 PM

That's true actually.

I doubt that :P What about the concrete base?

My house is made on a pier and beam foundation, no concrete needed.
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#37 Majestic

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 02:00 PM

My house is made on a pier and beam foundation, no concrete needed.

Fair 'nuff, but with a little hammer, you would be there for some time hammering and hammering until you get white finger.

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#38 Guest_ElatedOwl_*

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 02:48 PM

Which is the point of avoiding PHP. But hey, if it makes you happy, it doesn't matter too much.

#39 CSS

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 04:38 PM

CSS is more markup than programming, like HTML.

PHP is more of a programming language. Although it is interpreted by a C++ compiler it's still functional and could still classed as programming. It is Object Oriented and Procedural, it's a funny language, but it's very good, and is handy to know.


Yes I know. I do enjoy PHP a lot, I just am loving the CSS at the moment. It's simple, easy, and is just so beautiful if you're good at it! As in, the result is beautiful.

#40 Champion of Cyrodiil

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 05:25 PM

I like scripting when I am working on a project that requires translating a legacy data sets. I recently upgraded a system and spent part of two years(@+-40hrs/week) writing tools and scripts to translate pdfs, word, excel, csv/tsv/txt, html, etc.

Often they were from different groups that worked independently and there was about 20 years worth of complex scientific data. We spent a large portion of the first year creating a regex powered datamining tool that would ingest spreadsheets and map columns to definitions in several XML dictionaries. It has a drag and drop gui so that the end user can drag columns to tree nodes and create a "map". This allowed us to run further buisness logic on the reduced column of data based on information derived from the dictionaries.

This also meant that when requirements became more complex, and we had to change the way definitions could be stored in these dictionary trees, we had to change the end users tools.

Eventually I ended up writing a couple of scripts that would parse out spreadsheets, and i was able to just re-run the scripts on new data coming in from the legacy systems. (yes. "new" data from "legacy" sytems. FML.)

Anyway, scripting was great for parsing data but was slow.. for truly powerful tools compiled code i believe is more efficient. Which you can do with enterprise web apps that run compiled code on the back end while the user has a 'thin client'. Like Google Maps.